Interview In Progress

Nail Your Interview

Posted on November 16, 2013 · Posted in Workload

It’s tough out in the real world. There aren’t a load of jobs but if you’re proactive & can make your own opportunities, success will follow. Here are eight ways to nail your interview

1. ALWAYS KNOW YOUR STUFF

By now you should have some pretty solid research skills – so start applying them to the outside world. Do your homework before you even approach a studio or agency for a job. Know its portfolio, clients, industry position and why you would like to work there.

2. CUT THROUGH THE NOISE

Creative directors receive hundreds of emails, so you need to work hard to get their attention. personalise your email, but keep it short and concise, let you work do all the talking. If you’re sending samples, include web links so you don’t clog up their inbox.

3. NEVER BE LATE

Avoid being late to your interview at all costs – first impressions are crucial, and this is difficult to recover from. try to anticipate potential transport delays, and arrive early, it shows enthusiasm and professionalism, and sets you off on the right foot.

4. DRESS APPROPRIATELY

If you want to be viewed as a professional don’t turn up dressed like a student. Every studio is different, but smart-casual is a good rule of thumb for most entry level interviews. Full suit and tie is normally only appropriate at senior level.  If in doubt ask.

5. PERSONALITY COUNTS

Make sure your portfolio reflects who you are as a designer. Curate it with care. And don’t be afraid to show a little personality in the interview – success may hinge on how well you fit in with the team.

6. REMEMBER YOU’RE NOT GOD

Prepare notes about each project, and practice with friends or family. Be confident, but never arrogant. They’ll might already have brilliant creatives in the studio with more experience than you. be honest about you’re capabilities and show a eagerness to learn (you can never stop learning new stuff).

7. LEAVE A GOOD IMPRESSION

Even if you don’t get the job, if you’ve made a good impression the door is still open for the future. You never know when a job opportunity might pop up. Making good connections and good impressions is what it’s all about in the design industry. Word of mouth is essential.

8. KNOW WHERE THE JOBS ARE

If you don’t live in a major city, you may need to consider moving where the work the work is. although there’s also the option to strike out alone and work remotely as a freelancer, or collaborate with other like-minded designers.