Dealing With Stress

Beating Stress

Posted on September 22, 2013 ยท Posted in Workload

Your clients are demanding, deadlines are impossible and the kettle doesn’t work. Managing your workload can make your blood boil. Don’t let stress kill your creativity.

1. DON’T BE AN OSTRICH

If there are problems, be they financial or organisational, it’s best to deal with them head-on. If you bury your head in the sand, they’ll nag away at you and your stress levels will build. Whats more you could end up letting down your partners, employees, clients and suppliers. The best way to deal with stress is to stay on top of it.

2. LEARN A NEW SKILL

Don’t neglect your own skill set just because your being slowly crushed by responsibilities. Add to it by learning new tools, techniques and processes – 3D software, printmaking, life drawing…Learning a new skill can not only help relieve stress, it’ll also keep you creatively invigorated and give you a new perspective.

3. GET AWAY FROM IT ALL

Don’t feel like you have to be at your desk or in your place of work all the time. Spend time with friends and family. Go to the movies, hit a gallery, go to a gig – and be sue to take your holidays. it’s important to get away from it all and recharge. And remember, leaving the office to visit clients isn’t really the same thing.

4. GET ORGANISED

There’s nothing worse than a surprise deadline, so make sure your time management practices are up to scratch. keep a diary or use an online calender app, have a to do list next on your desk, or stick up a wall planner and plot out your current jobs.

5. KEEP A DAILY ROUTINE

Routine is comforting and keeps stress at bay. Lots of people have one. typically, it goes like this: deal with emails and client queries, meet with creative teams and/or clients, design and directional work, seek out inspiration, more design work, review current projects and, finally answer the emails that have arrived during the day.

6. SAYING ‘NO’ IS THE BEST THERAPY

Don’t fall into the trap of saying yes to every piece of work or request that comes in. If you’re extremely busy, it’s a sign of your success. Revel in it, but maybe you can afford to say ‘no’ – if you explain why, a good client will understand. And it might just boost your reputation too.