Pitfalls

Six Common Portfolio Pitfalls

Posted on September 24, 2013 ยท Posted in Self Promotion

In a industry where you only get a few seconds to make that all important first impression, its vital that you don’t ignore these common portfolio pitfalls.

1. INFORMATION OVERLOAD

prospective clients or employers who view your portfolio won’t necessarily be familiar with your work. However, while it’s important to include key information, try to avoid cramming in to much, too soon. Your portfolio needs t be clear and uncluttered – it’s not your CV.

2. BE HONEST

The industry is littered with stories of designers laying claim to being the creative driving force behind a project when it turns out they only did a few pieces of the art work on it. Be honest about your involvement on a project; clients will check. and never, ever include anything that isn’t yours.

3. DON’T LOSE YOUR AUDIENCE

Your work needs to be easy to view and your portfolio should be easy to navigate, with clearly signposted bio and contact information – otherwise you’ll lose your audience. Whenever building an online folio or crafting a print version, make sure that your navigation is a s seamless and intuitive as possible.

4. POOR WRITING

Even if words aren’t your strength, it’s worth spending time working with the copy in your portfolio. This means checking for spelling, grammatical errors, and obsolete phrases and words. Keep your copy clean and brief. if in doubt, get someone to proofread it for you.

5. MAKING THEM WAIT

Loading screens: no one has the patience for them, especially not a potential employer/client trying to find a new creative source. Making anyone wait to get to your work is a huge fail – and this rule applies to all types of portfolios – so ensure your landing page loads fast and puts you and your work front and center.

6. GET YOUR STORY STRAIGHT

You can include a link to downloadable resume by all means, but creative directors need to sense a progression and adaptation in your work – evidence that your skills set has grown. Stuffing a portfolio full of similar pieces isn’t advisable; show the breadth of your work in an ordered fashion.